Family Members' Perceptions of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Device Use Purpose Although advancements in technology have expanded the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices for children with disabilities, the use of AAC devices in school and home settings is often inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to examine family members' perceptions regarding the use of AAC devices. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2006
Family Members' Perceptions of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Device Use
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rita L. Bailey
    Illinois State University, Normal
  • Howard P. Parette, Jr.
    Illinois State University, Normal
  • Julia B. Stoner
    Illinois State University, Normal
  • Maureen E. Angell
    Illinois State University, Normal
  • Kathleen Carroll
    Illinois State University, Normal
  • Contact author: Rita L. Bailey, 102 West Virginia Avenue Normal, IL 61761. Email: rlbaile@ilstu.edu
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2006
Family Members' Perceptions of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Device Use
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2006, Vol. 37, 50-60. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/006)
History: Received August 25, 2004 , Revised November 23, 2004 , Accepted January 17, 2005
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2006, Vol. 37, 50-60. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/006)
History: Received August 25, 2004; Revised November 23, 2004; Accepted January 17, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 39

Purpose Although advancements in technology have expanded the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices for children with disabilities, the use of AAC devices in school and home settings is often inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to examine family members' perceptions regarding the use of AAC devices. Factors that were perceived to affect student’s use of AAC devices, family expectations, and benefits of AAC device use were explored.

Method Semistructured interviews were conducted with 6 family members (primary caregivers) of 7 youth who primarily use AAC devices to communicate in the school environment. The interviews were analyzed using cross-case analysis.

Results A variety of common perspectives emerged from the data, including four thematic categories: expectations, facilitators, barriers, and benefits of AAC device use.

Implications Information gained in this investigation may be used to improve professional-family and teaming relationships and serve to benefit AAC users in school and home settings.

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