English Language Narratives of Filipino Children Purpose The current study focuses on describing the English language narrative skills of children who have been exposed to the Filipino language. Method Eight children between the ages of 6;0 (years;months) and 7;7 who spoke primarily English but who were exposed to the Filipino language at home participated. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2006
English Language Narratives of Filipino Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lee Ann L. Lofranco
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Elizabeth D. Peña
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Lisa M. Bedore
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Contact author: Elizabeth D. Peña, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station A1100, Austin, TX. Email: lizp@mail.utexas.edu
  • Lee Ann Lofranco is now affiliated with Riverside Medical Center, Inc., Bacolod City, Philippines.
    Lee Ann Lofranco is now affiliated with Riverside Medical Center, Inc., Bacolod City, Philippines.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2006
English Language Narratives of Filipino Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2006, Vol. 37, 28-38. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/004)
History: Received December 13, 2004 , Revised March 22, 2005 , Accepted May 16, 2005
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2006, Vol. 37, 28-38. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/004)
History: Received December 13, 2004; Revised March 22, 2005; Accepted May 16, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 12

Purpose The current study focuses on describing the English language narrative skills of children who have been exposed to the Filipino language.

Method Eight children between the ages of 6;0 (years;months) and 7;7 who spoke primarily English but who were exposed to the Filipino language at home participated. Each child produced three narrative samples based on wordless picture books. Samples were analyzed for narrative complexity as well as measures of productivity and grammaticality.

Results The complexity of children’s narratives was comparable to that reported in the literature for monolingual English-speaking children. Grammaticality measures show use of an average of 16.55% Filipino-influenced English forms across three stories. The observed patterns of Filipino-influenced English were predictable based on the comparison of English and Filipino structures. Variability in maze use was related to the amount of exposure to Filipino.

Clinical Implications Care should be taken to evaluate grammaticality with respect to nonstandard English forms predicted by the rules of the language in contact with English. Further, maze use may be related to level of exposure to another language and should be further explored when using such information in language evaluation.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Funding was provided to the first author by the Fulbright Foundation. This work was completed while the second author was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA.
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