A Stuttering Education and Bullying Awareness and Prevention Resource: A Feasibility Study Purpose This pretest–posttest study examined the feasibility of using a curriculum-level stuttering education and bullying awareness and prevention program to improve peer attitudes toward children who stutter and attitudes toward bullying. Knowledge about potential responses to bullying and students' liking of the program also were examined. Method Data ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   July 01, 2012
A Stuttering Education and Bullying Awareness and Prevention Resource: A Feasibility Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marilyn Langevin
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
  • N. G. Narasimha Prasad
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
  • Disclosure Statement
    Disclosure Statement×
    All proceeds of the sales of the Teasing and Bullying: Unacceptable Behaviour (TAB) program are retained by the Institute for Stuttering Treatment and Research as publisher. The Institute has no right to approve/or disprove publication of research related to TAB.
    All proceeds of the sales of the Teasing and Bullying: Unacceptable Behaviour (TAB) program are retained by the Institute for Stuttering Treatment and Research as publisher. The Institute has no right to approve/or disprove publication of research related to TAB.×
  • Correspondence to Marilyn Langevin: marilyn.langevin@ualberta.ca
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Ilsa Schwarz
    Associate Editor: Ilsa Schwarz×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research Forum
Research Forum   |   July 01, 2012
A Stuttering Education and Bullying Awareness and Prevention Resource: A Feasibility Study
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2012, Vol. 43, 344-358. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2012/11-0031)
History: Received May 3, 2011 , Revised October 22, 2011 , Accepted February 16, 2012
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2012, Vol. 43, 344-358. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2012/11-0031)
History: Received May 3, 2011; Revised October 22, 2011; Accepted February 16, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

Purpose This pretest–posttest study examined the feasibility of using a curriculum-level stuttering education and bullying awareness and prevention program to improve peer attitudes toward children who stutter and attitudes toward bullying. Knowledge about potential responses to bullying and students' liking of the program also were examined.

Method Data were obtained from 608 children who participated in the stuttering education and bullying prevention initiative that used the Teasing and Bullying: Unacceptable Behaviour (TAB; Langevin, 2000) Program. Participants completed the Peer Attitudes Toward Children Who Stutter (PATCS; Langevin, 2009; Langevin & Hagler, 2004; Langevin, Kleitman, Packman, & Onslow, 2009) scale, the Provictim scale (Rigby & Slee, 1991, 1993), and bullying involvement and knowledge questionnaires.

Results Statistically and practically significant improvements were found for both questionnaires. Children who did not know someone who stutters had higher change scores on the PATCS than children who knew someone who stutters. In general, children who were uninvolved in bullying had the most positive changes in attitudes and liked the TAB program the most. Victims liked the program significantly more often than children who were perpetrators of bullying or were dually involved in bullying.

Conclusion Findings suggest that the TAB program may have the potential to effect positive changes in peer attitudes toward children who stutter and toward bullying. Further research using a randomized experimental design is warranted.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by grants from an anonymous donor group and the Elks and Royal Purple of Associations of Alberta. Thank you to all of the children and teachers who participated in this project; the schools that participated; Catherine Knott, Sandy Stone, and Laura Stock, who worked on this project as research assistants; Kathryn Ahl, who consulted in the development of TAB and the teacher training seminar, and numerous volunteer research assistants who participated in crosschecking data entry.
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