The Power of Negative Findings In schools today, many children have deficits in the comprehension and production of spoken and written language—problems that limit their academic success (Tomblin & Nippold, 2012). Because of the close connection between language development and educational achievement, school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are expected to play a key role in ... Editorial
Editorial  |   July 01, 2012
The Power of Negative Findings
 
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Editorial
Editorial   |   July 01, 2012
The Power of Negative Findings
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2012, Vol. 43, 251-252. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2012/ed-03)
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2012, Vol. 43, 251-252. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2012/ed-03)
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2
In schools today, many children have deficits in the comprehension and production of spoken and written language—problems that limit their academic success (Tomblin & Nippold, 2012). Because of the close connection between language development and educational achievement, school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are expected to play a key role in treating those deficits (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association [ASHA], 2010). Accordingly, in this era of evidence-based practice, SLPs are searching for objective information from research indicating what treatment approaches are most effective with school-age children.
It is encouraging to know that our scholarly journals—including Language, Speech, and HearingServices in Schools (LSHSS)—regularly publish articles that address the treatment of language disorders in school-age children. For example, during the past 10 years alone, nearly 200 articles relevant to this topic were published in LSHSS. Despite this tremendous progress, there is still a need for more studies that directly examine the effectiveness of different approaches to treatment with school-age children in areas such as syntax and morphology, word knowledge, pragmatics, and discourse (Cirrin & Gillam, 2008). In other words, we all want more information from language intervention studies telling us what works best!
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