Postschool Educational and Employment Experiences of Young People With Specific Language Impairment Purpose This study examined the postschool educational and employment experiences of young people with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Method Nineteen-year-olds with (n = 50) and without (n = 50) SLI were interviewed on their education and employment experiences since finishing compulsory secondary education. Results ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 2012
Postschool Educational and Employment Experiences of Young People With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gina Conti-Ramsden
    The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
  • Kevin Durkin
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland
  • Correspondence to Gina Conti-Ramsden: gina.conti-ramsden@manchester.ac.uk
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Martin Fujiki
    Associate Editor: Martin Fujiki×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Clinical Forum: Language and Communication Disorders in Adolescents
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 2012
Postschool Educational and Employment Experiences of Young People With Specific Language Impairment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2012, Vol. 43, 507-520. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2012/11-0067)
History: Received August 31, 2011 , Revised December 12, 2011 , Accepted January 30, 2012
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2012, Vol. 43, 507-520. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2012/11-0067)
History: Received August 31, 2011; Revised December 12, 2011; Accepted January 30, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

Purpose This study examined the postschool educational and employment experiences of young people with and without specific language impairment (SLI).

Method Nineteen-year-olds with (n = 50) and without (n = 50) SLI were interviewed on their education and employment experiences since finishing compulsory secondary education.

Results On average, young people with SLI were less successful than their peers without SLI, but they did attain some achievements. Young people with SLI obtained ∼2, mostly vocational qualifications in the first few years post school. Young people continuing in education at 19 years were most commonly in lower level educational placements than their typically developing (TD) peers. Performance IQ and language/literacy skills were the strongest predictors of educational experience level at this age. Young people with SLI truant less and report feeling more supported than TD peers. In terms of employment, similar proportions of young people with and without SLI had jobs. A larger proportion of young people with SLI, however, were not in education, employment, or training at 19 years of age.

Conclusion In the immediate postschool years, young people with SLI fare less well in education and employment than their TD peers.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors gratefully acknowledge a fellowship from the Economic and Social Research Council (RES-063-27-0066) that was awarded to the first author and a grant from the Nuffield Foundation (EDU/8366). We would also like to thank Zoë Simkin for her help with data organization and the participants who gave their time so generously.
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