Itard and Language Pedagogy: A Commentary for Teachers of Children with Special Language Needs The 19th century, surgeon-turned-educator wrestled with instructional procedures in sensory, concept, and communication development for a mute, adolescent, “incurably retarded” boy. The teacher made language his most important programmatic focus since, without it, whatever else the student might learn could not be mentally codified and retained. Itard’s training steps are ... Research Article
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Research Article  |   October 01, 1979
Itard and Language Pedagogy: A Commentary for Teachers of Children with Special Language Needs
 
Author Notes
  • Frances Lamberts is associated with the Illinois Regional Resource Center at Northern Illinois University. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at the Illinois Regional Resource Center, 242 Graham Hall, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115. Ted L. Miller is associated with the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.
    Frances Lamberts is associated with the Illinois Regional Resource Center at Northern Illinois University. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at the Illinois Regional Resource Center, 242 Graham Hall, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115. Ted L. Miller is associated with the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1979
Itard and Language Pedagogy: A Commentary for Teachers of Children with Special Language Needs
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1979, Vol. 10, 203-211. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1004.203
History: Received November 16, 1978 , Accepted January 5, 1979
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1979, Vol. 10, 203-211. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1004.203
History: Received November 16, 1978; Accepted January 5, 1979

The 19th century, surgeon-turned-educator wrestled with instructional procedures in sensory, concept, and communication development for a mute, adolescent, “incurably retarded” boy. The teacher made language his most important programmatic focus since, without it, whatever else the student might learn could not be mentally codified and retained. Itard’s training steps are outlined and the major instructional principles described. It is argued that speech-language personnel, as well as teachers, when facing the task of language instruction with the mentally handicapped, may benefit from a thoughtful examination of Itard’s philosophy, procedures, and errors in language training.

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