Articulatory Stimulability Reviewed This article examines the clinical value of articulatory stimulability through an analysis of past research and a review of clinical implementation. Stimulability has been repeatedly researched as a prognostic indicator of spontaneous remission and, on a more limited basis, of therapeutic responsiveness. Though frequently defined as the difference between spontaneous ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1979
Articulatory Stimulability Reviewed
 
Author Notes
  • Charles L. Madison, Ph.D. is coordinator of Clinical Services, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington
    Charles L. Madison, Ph.D. is coordinator of Clinical Services, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1979
Articulatory Stimulability Reviewed
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1979, Vol. 10, 185-190. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1003.185
History: Received August 15, 1978 , Accepted December 6, 1978
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1979, Vol. 10, 185-190. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1003.185
History: Received August 15, 1978; Accepted December 6, 1978

This article examines the clinical value of articulatory stimulability through an analysis of past research and a review of clinical implementation. Stimulability has been repeatedly researched as a prognostic indicator of spontaneous remission and, on a more limited basis, of therapeutic responsiveness. Though frequently defined as the difference between spontaneous and imitative testing responses, additional clinical procedures for the evaluation of stimulability are reviewed. The clinical implications of isolated sound, syllable, and word level stimulability are discussed.

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