Relationship Among Race, Social Status, and Sex of Preschoolers' Normal Dysfluencies: A Cross-Cultural Investigation This study compared the rate of dysfluency found among lower social status black, lower social status white, middle social status black, and middle social status white preschool children. Spontaneous language samples were analyzed using a six category dysfluency classification system. Multivariate analyses revealed that dysfluency does not vary as a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1979
Relationship Among Race, Social Status, and Sex of Preschoolers' Normal Dysfluencies: A Cross-Cultural Investigation
 
Author Notes
  • David L. Ratusnik is an associate professor and associate scientist, Department of Otolaryngology and Brochoesophagology, Rush Medical College, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60612. Requests for reprints may be sent there. Ellaine Kiriluk is a speech-language pathologist, LaGrange Area Department of Special Education. LaGrange, Illinois. Carol Melnick Ratusnik is an instructor, Department of Otolaryngology and a speech-language pathologist, Center For Handicapped Children, University of Illinois Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.
    David L. Ratusnik is an associate professor and associate scientist, Department of Otolaryngology and Brochoesophagology, Rush Medical College, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60612. Requests for reprints may be sent there. Ellaine Kiriluk is a speech-language pathologist, LaGrange Area Department of Special Education. LaGrange, Illinois. Carol Melnick Ratusnik is an instructor, Department of Otolaryngology and a speech-language pathologist, Center For Handicapped Children, University of Illinois Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1979
Relationship Among Race, Social Status, and Sex of Preschoolers' Normal Dysfluencies: A Cross-Cultural Investigation
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1979, Vol. 10, 171-177. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1003.171
History: Received September 18, 1978 , Accepted December 6, 1978
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1979, Vol. 10, 171-177. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1003.171
History: Received September 18, 1978; Accepted December 6, 1978

This study compared the rate of dysfluency found among lower social status black, lower social status white, middle social status black, and middle social status white preschool children. Spontaneous language samples were analyzed using a six category dysfluency classification system. Multivariate analyses revealed that dysfluency does not vary as a function of race, social status background, or sex. In addition, the relative contribution of specific types of dysfluency to total dysfluency is virtually identical in each socio-cultural group.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access