An Analysis of the Reinforcing Function of Clinician Attention This paper examines the reinforcing effects of attention in speech-language remediation. It concludes that: 1) attention may be a strong positive reinforcer for any behavior upon which it is contingent, 2) attention may serve as a reinforcer regardless of the intent of clinicians' verbal statements which accompany it, and 3) ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1979
An Analysis of the Reinforcing Function of Clinician Attention
 
Author Notes
  • James C. Moore is an associate professor in the department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, College of Communication, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida. Requests for reprints may be sent there.
    James C. Moore is an associate professor in the department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, College of Communication, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida. Requests for reprints may be sent there.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1979
An Analysis of the Reinforcing Function of Clinician Attention
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1979, Vol. 10, 93-98. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1002.93
History: Received December 3, 1977 , Accepted September 11, 1978
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1979, Vol. 10, 93-98. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1002.93
History: Received December 3, 1977; Accepted September 11, 1978

This paper examines the reinforcing effects of attention in speech-language remediation. It concludes that: 1) attention may be a strong positive reinforcer for any behavior upon which it is contingent, 2) attention may serve as a reinforcer regardless of the intent of clinicians' verbal statements which accompany it, and 3) clinician attention affects group behavior and patterns of peer reinforcement.

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