Effective Leadership of Parent Discussion Groups This discussion is designed to help clinicians in schools who work with groups of parents of handicapped children. Specifically, suggestions are made to help these clinicians function more effectively as leaders. Emphasis is placed on the following: 1) selecting topics for discussion; 2) seating participants in order to promote interaction; ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1979
Effective Leadership of Parent Discussion Groups
 
Author Notes
  • Elizabeth J. Webster is a professor in audiology and speech pathology at Memphis State University. Brenda M. Cole is a clinical instructor in audiology and speech pathology at Memphis State University. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at the Memphis State University Speech & Hearing Center, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee 38105.
    Elizabeth J. Webster is a professor in audiology and speech pathology at Memphis State University. Brenda M. Cole is a clinical instructor in audiology and speech pathology at Memphis State University. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at the Memphis State University Speech & Hearing Center, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee 38105.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1979
Effective Leadership of Parent Discussion Groups
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1979, Vol. 10, 72-80. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1002.72
History: Received September 15, 1977 , Accepted August 21, 1978
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1979, Vol. 10, 72-80. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1002.72
History: Received September 15, 1977; Accepted August 21, 1978

This discussion is designed to help clinicians in schools who work with groups of parents of handicapped children. Specifically, suggestions are made to help these clinicians function more effectively as leaders. Emphasis is placed on the following: 1) selecting topics for discussion; 2) seating participants in order to promote interaction; 3) respecting parents' needs to be silent; 4) recognizing similarities among parents; 5) providing them equal opportunities for participation; 6) responding to nonverbal cues; and 7) using open-ended questions and leading statements.

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