An Argument for the Use of a Recorded Speaker in the Administration of a Speech-in-Noise Test This study examined the speaker-induced variability in an auditory perceptual test. Normal-speaking graduate students in speech-language pathology and audiology recorded List 1 of the PBK word list. The recordings were mixed with white noise at a signal-to-noise ratio of 0 dB and played to a group of normal-hearing college students ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1979
An Argument for the Use of a Recorded Speaker in the Administration of a Speech-in-Noise Test
 
Author Notes
  • Gerard L. Kupperman is assistant professor, Arnold House, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003. Requests for reprints may be sent to him there. Roy W. Gengel is associate professor in the Department of Communication Disorders of the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.
    Gerard L. Kupperman is assistant professor, Arnold House, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003. Requests for reprints may be sent to him there. Roy W. Gengel is associate professor in the Department of Communication Disorders of the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1979
An Argument for the Use of a Recorded Speaker in the Administration of a Speech-in-Noise Test
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1979, Vol. 10, 120-125. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1002.120
History: Received January 10, 1978 , Accepted September 5, 1978
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1979, Vol. 10, 120-125. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1002.120
History: Received January 10, 1978; Accepted September 5, 1978

This study examined the speaker-induced variability in an auditory perceptual test. Normal-speaking graduate students in speech-language pathology and audiology recorded List 1 of the PBK word list. The recordings were mixed with white noise at a signal-to-noise ratio of 0 dB and played to a group of normal-hearing college students and a group of normal-hearing junior high school students. Significant differences based on speaker variability were obtained. These differences could lead to misinterpretations of test results and inaccurate assessment of a child’s auditory perceptual abilities.

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