Effect of Negative Verbal Stimuli on the Occurrence of Negation in Language Samples This study compared the number of negative responses obtained in two language sampling conditions. One language sample was elicited using parallel talk containing negative constructions. A second sample was elicited using parallel talk containing affirmative constructions. The order of experimental conditions was randomized for each of the eighteen kindergarten children ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1979
Effect of Negative Verbal Stimuli on the Occurrence of Negation in Language Samples
 
Author Notes
  • James A. Till is assistant professor, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98105. Requests for reprints may be sent to him there. Carla Dunn Buford is completing a doctoral program in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Washington.
    James A. Till is assistant professor, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98105. Requests for reprints may be sent to him there. Carla Dunn Buford is completing a doctoral program in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Washington.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1979
Effect of Negative Verbal Stimuli on the Occurrence of Negation in Language Samples
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1979, Vol. 10, 111-119. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1002.111
History: Received June 9, 1978 , Accepted August 17, 1978
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1979, Vol. 10, 111-119. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1002.111
History: Received June 9, 1978; Accepted August 17, 1978

This study compared the number of negative responses obtained in two language sampling conditions. One language sample was elicited using parallel talk containing negative constructions. A second sample was elicited using parallel talk containing affirmative constructions. The order of experimental conditions was randomized for each of the eighteen kindergarten children studied. The same clinician and materials were used in each condition. The results showed no significant differences between the two language sampling conditions. The negative parallel-talk stimuli did not elicit more negative responses than did the affirmative parallel-talk stimuli. The results are interpreted in terms of eliciting language samples for normative comparisons and elicitng samples that attempt to insure the use of negatives.

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