A Field Study of Children’s Hearing Aids in a School Environment Results are presented from a five-year survey that involved auditory and visual checks of hearing aids worn by hearing-impaired children in a special education program. During the first three years of the survey, the aids were inspected on a weekly basis by an audiologist who visited the children’s special classes. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1979
A Field Study of Children’s Hearing Aids in a School Environment
 
Author Notes
  • F. Joseph Kemker is associated with Shands Teaching Hospital, Department of Communicative Disorders, Box J-174, Gainesville, Florida 32610. Requests for reprints may be sent there. Freeman McConnell and Susan A. Logan are with the Bill Wilkerson Hearing and Speech Center, Nashville, Tennessee. Betty W. Green is in Hunsville, Alabama.
    F. Joseph Kemker is associated with Shands Teaching Hospital, Department of Communicative Disorders, Box J-174, Gainesville, Florida 32610. Requests for reprints may be sent there. Freeman McConnell and Susan A. Logan are with the Bill Wilkerson Hearing and Speech Center, Nashville, Tennessee. Betty W. Green is in Hunsville, Alabama.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1979
A Field Study of Children’s Hearing Aids in a School Environment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1979, Vol. 10, 47-53. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1001.47
History: Received July 15, 1977 , Accepted July 21, 1978
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1979, Vol. 10, 47-53. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1001.47
History: Received July 15, 1977; Accepted July 21, 1978

Results are presented from a five-year survey that involved auditory and visual checks of hearing aids worn by hearing-impaired children in a special education program. During the first three years of the survey, the aids were inspected on a weekly basis by an audiologist who visited the children’s special classes. In the last two years of the survey, hearing aid inspection was performed daily by the teachers and teacher aides and weekly by the audiologist. The greatest proportion of hearing aid malfunctions over the five years resulted from weak or dead batteries. The daily hearing aid inspection program reduced by one-half the average number of malfunctions per child.

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