The Ability of Listeners to Report Oral Responses of Black and White Children A group of 20 black and 20 white college students viewed videotapes of eight first-grade boys and recorded in writing the boys' responses to 10 vocabulary items from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC). The eight boys represented four dialect groups: black standard, black nonstandard, white standard, and white ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1979
The Ability of Listeners to Report Oral Responses of Black and White Children
 
Author Notes
  • Kathryn Clark Gerken is associate professor and Coordinator, School Psychology Program, Division of Special Education, College of Education, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242. Requests for reprints may be sent to her there, John W. Deichmann is an associate professor in the Department of Guidance and Educational Psychology, College of Education, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois.
    Kathryn Clark Gerken is associate professor and Coordinator, School Psychology Program, Division of Special Education, College of Education, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242. Requests for reprints may be sent to her there, John W. Deichmann is an associate professor in the Department of Guidance and Educational Psychology, College of Education, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1979
The Ability of Listeners to Report Oral Responses of Black and White Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1979, Vol. 10, 35-46. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1001.35
History: Received August 15, 1977 , Accepted August 21, 1978
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1979, Vol. 10, 35-46. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1001.35
History: Received August 15, 1977; Accepted August 21, 1978

A group of 20 black and 20 white college students viewed videotapes of eight first-grade boys and recorded in writing the boys' responses to 10 vocabulary items from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC). The eight boys represented four dialect groups: black standard, black nonstandard, white standard, and white nonstandard. Analysis of the data revealed significant interactions between race and dialect of child relative to (1) a listener’s ability to report in writing a child’s verbatim responses without producing a change in the WISC scoring of the responses, and (2) a listener’s ability to restate in writing a child’s responses without producing a change in the scoring of the responses. Further, both dialect and race of child were found to be significantly related to (3) the total number of errors the listener makes in writing the child’s responses. The race of the listener as a main effect was not found to be significantly related to (1), (2), or (3). However, significant interaction did occur between race of listener and race of child, as well as among race of listener, race of child, and dialect of child relative to (3), the total number of errors the listener makes in writing the child’s responses.

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