Responses to the Language of Educable Mentally Retarded and Normal Children: Stereotypes and Judgments Seventy-five graduate students in speech pathology and audiology rated the speech and language of educable mentally retarded and normal children. The results indicated that the judges held stereotypes, or preconceived ideas, about language behavior of educable mentally retarded and normal children. These stereotypes were reflected in their judgments of children’s ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1979
Responses to the Language of Educable Mentally Retarded and Normal Children: Stereotypes and Judgments
 
Author Notes
  • Rita C. Naremore is chairperson of the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at Indiana University. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at the Speech and Hearing Center, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47401. Nicholas M. Hipskind is an associate professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at Indiana University.
    Rita C. Naremore is chairperson of the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at Indiana University. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at the Speech and Hearing Center, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47401. Nicholas M. Hipskind is an associate professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at Indiana University.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1979
Responses to the Language of Educable Mentally Retarded and Normal Children: Stereotypes and Judgments
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1979, Vol. 10, 27-34. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1001.27
History: Received July 15, 1977 , Accepted July 19, 1978
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1979, Vol. 10, 27-34. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1001.27
History: Received July 15, 1977; Accepted July 19, 1978

Seventy-five graduate students in speech pathology and audiology rated the speech and language of educable mentally retarded and normal children. The results indicated that the judges held stereotypes, or preconceived ideas, about language behavior of educable mentally retarded and normal children. These stereotypes were reflected in their judgments of children’s verbal language.

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