Enhancement of Language Comprehension in Developmentally Delayed Children This article describes the use of receptive language tasks presented in a cognitive, problem-solving context as a method for enhancing language comprehension in developmentally delayed children. Over a two-year period 16 language-impaired and developmentally delayed children were provided eight weeks of concentrated instruction in five language areas: nouns, verbs, adjectives, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1978
Enhancement of Language Comprehension in Developmentally Delayed Children
 
Author Notes
  • Ralph O. Coleman is an associate professor of speech-language pathology and audiology and Daryl E. Anderson is an assistant professor of speech-language pathology. Both are affiliated with the Child Development and Rehabilitation Center, University of Oregon Health Sciences Center, P.O. Box 574, Portland, Oregon 97207.
    Ralph O. Coleman is an associate professor of speech-language pathology and audiology and Daryl E. Anderson is an assistant professor of speech-language pathology. Both are affiliated with the Child Development and Rehabilitation Center, University of Oregon Health Sciences Center, P.O. Box 574, Portland, Oregon 97207.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1978
Enhancement of Language Comprehension in Developmentally Delayed Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1978, Vol. 9, 241-253. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0904.241
History: Received June 15, 1977 , Accepted April 19, 1978
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1978, Vol. 9, 241-253. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0904.241
History: Received June 15, 1977; Accepted April 19, 1978

This article describes the use of receptive language tasks presented in a cognitive, problem-solving context as a method for enhancing language comprehension in developmentally delayed children. Over a two-year period 16 language-impaired and developmentally delayed children were provided eight weeks of concentrated instruction in five language areas: nouns, verbs, adjectives, prepositions, and syntax. Instruction consisted of systematic verbal stimulation with no overt attempts to elicit expressive language. Instead, tasks were structured to elicit motor behaviors. Results of the project indicate a marked increase in the number of stimuli to which the children could provide appropriate responses at the end of the eight-week instructional period. These gains also were maintained three months after termination of instruction.

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