Sequential Features of Black Child Language This study determines whether the spontaneous speech of black children between the ages of 18 and 36 months contained Brown’s semantic relations. The study also attempted to identify the existence of certain distinctive Black English (BE) features. The results indicate that the sequential acquisition of specific semantic relations by the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1978
Sequential Features of Black Child Language
 
Author Notes
  • Yvonne Mallory is a speech and language specialist for the Los Angeles Unified School District. Darwin L. Chapman is an assistant professor in the speech pathology and audiology program at the Pennsylvania State University. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at the Speech and Hearing Clinic, Pennsylvania State University, 110 Moore Building, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802.
    Yvonne Mallory is a speech and language specialist for the Los Angeles Unified School District. Darwin L. Chapman is an assistant professor in the speech pathology and audiology program at the Pennsylvania State University. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at the Speech and Hearing Clinic, Pennsylvania State University, 110 Moore Building, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1978
Sequential Features of Black Child Language
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1978, Vol. 9, 204-209. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0904.204
History: Received July 7, 1977 , Accepted September 1, 1977
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1978, Vol. 9, 204-209. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0904.204
History: Received July 7, 1977; Accepted September 1, 1977

This study determines whether the spontaneous speech of black children between the ages of 18 and 36 months contained Brown’s semantic relations. The study also attempted to identify the existence of certain distinctive Black English (BE) features. The results indicate that the sequential acquisition of specific semantic relations by the black preschoolers in this study is equivalent to that of white children with one exception—the absence of the semantic category of recurrence. Three BE features were noted among the children (1) absence of the copula in the present tense, (2) parallel absence of the form to be, and (3) phonological simplification of consonant clusters that affect the use of verb tense. All of these features were found beginning at the age of 24 months in all children studied, irrespective of class distinction.

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