A Comparison of Two Procedures (NSST and Concrete Objects) for Measuring Receptive and Expressive Language of Mentally Retarded Children This study involves administration of the NSST and Concrete Objects Test to 30 trainable mentally retarded children. A comparison of test results indicates that the use of concrete objects to measure the receptive language of this population yields more satisfactory results than a picture-sentence association task. Modifications for testing some ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1978
A Comparison of Two Procedures (NSST and Concrete Objects) for Measuring Receptive and Expressive Language of Mentally Retarded Children
 
Author Notes
  • Jane Martin is an associate professor, Department of Reading and Speech Correction, Glassboro State College, Glassboro, New Jersey 08028. Requests for reprints may be sent there. Bonnie Engel is an assistant professor in the Department of Reading and Speech Correction at Glassboro State College.
    Jane Martin is an associate professor, Department of Reading and Speech Correction, Glassboro State College, Glassboro, New Jersey 08028. Requests for reprints may be sent there. Bonnie Engel is an assistant professor in the Department of Reading and Speech Correction at Glassboro State College.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1978
A Comparison of Two Procedures (NSST and Concrete Objects) for Measuring Receptive and Expressive Language of Mentally Retarded Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1978, Vol. 9, 176-182. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0903.176
History: Received November 12, 1976 , Accepted August 4, 1977
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1978, Vol. 9, 176-182. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0903.176
History: Received November 12, 1976; Accepted August 4, 1977

This study involves administration of the NSST and Concrete Objects Test to 30 trainable mentally retarded children. A comparison of test results indicates that the use of concrete objects to measure the receptive language of this population yields more satisfactory results than a picture-sentence association task. Modifications for testing some syntactic forms are discussed.

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