Choosing Stimulus Materials for Eliciting Language Samples from Children with Language Disorders Language samples were elicited from seven children with language disorders in three different stimulus conditions. In one condition, the children talked about toys taken from the clinic’s stock; in another, they talked about toys brought from home; and in the third, there were no stimulus materials present and the examiner ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1978
Choosing Stimulus Materials for Eliciting Language Samples from Children with Language Disorders
 
Author Notes
  • Sharon L. James is an assistant professor in communicative disorders at Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York. Marjorie Button is a graduate student at Syracuse University. Requests for reprints may be sent to James at the Division of Special Education, Syracuse University, 805 South Crouse Avenue, Syracuse, New York 13210.
    Sharon L. James is an assistant professor in communicative disorders at Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York. Marjorie Button is a graduate student at Syracuse University. Requests for reprints may be sent to James at the Division of Special Education, Syracuse University, 805 South Crouse Avenue, Syracuse, New York 13210.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1978
Choosing Stimulus Materials for Eliciting Language Samples from Children with Language Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1978, Vol. 9, 91-97. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0902.91
History: Received February 15, 1977 , Accepted July 18, 1977
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1978, Vol. 9, 91-97. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0902.91
History: Received February 15, 1977; Accepted July 18, 1977

Language samples were elicited from seven children with language disorders in three different stimulus conditions. In one condition, the children talked about toys taken from the clinic’s stock; in another, they talked about toys brought from home; and in the third, there were no stimulus materials present and the examiner engaged the children in conversation. The samples were analyzed for mean length of utterance (MLU), syntactic complexity (Lee’s DSS), and the number of scorable DSS and MLU utterances elicited in the first 15 min of each stimulus condition. Results indicated that the stimulus condition had no significant effect on the children’s DSS or MLU scores. The familiar-toy and conversation-only conditions were more efficient in eliciting scorable utterances for the MLU measure than clinic toys.

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