Sex-Role Stereotypes in Speech and Language Tests Eight speech and language tests were examined to determine how males and females are represented in them. It was found that (1) females are underrepresented in pictures and in sentences, (2) both sexes engage in sex-stereotyped activities more frequently than they engage in neutral activities or activities characteristic of the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1978
Sex-Role Stereotypes in Speech and Language Tests
 
Author Notes
  • Mary Breslin Rabe received a B.S. in speech-language pathology and audiology from the State University of New York at Geneseo. This paper is based on research she conducted for a course on psychology of women. She is currently a speech-language pathologist in the Lee County School System, Tupelo, Mississippi. Margaret W. Matlin is an assistant professor at the State University of New York at Geneseo. Requests for reprints may be sent to her there at the Department of Psychology, Geneseo, New York 14454.
    Mary Breslin Rabe received a B.S. in speech-language pathology and audiology from the State University of New York at Geneseo. This paper is based on research she conducted for a course on psychology of women. She is currently a speech-language pathologist in the Lee County School System, Tupelo, Mississippi. Margaret W. Matlin is an assistant professor at the State University of New York at Geneseo. Requests for reprints may be sent to her there at the Department of Psychology, Geneseo, New York 14454.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1978
Sex-Role Stereotypes in Speech and Language Tests
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1978, Vol. 9, 70-76. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0902.70
History: Received August 6, 1976 , Accepted July 21, 1977
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1978, Vol. 9, 70-76. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0902.70
History: Received August 6, 1976; Accepted July 21, 1977

Eight speech and language tests were examined to determine how males and females are represented in them. It was found that (1) females are underrepresented in pictures and in sentences, (2) both sexes engage in sex-stereotyped activities more frequently than they engage in neutral activities or activities characteristic of the opposite sex, (3) sex stereotyping is more marked for adults than for children, and (4) sex stereotyping is more marked for males than for females.

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