Protrusive Lingual Force and Lingual Diadochokinetic Rates: A Comparative Analysis between Normal and Lisping Speakers This study examines protrusive lingual force and lingual diadochokinetic rates in normal and frontal-lisping speakers. Force measurements were obtained using an instrument designed for this investigation. Results revealed that normal-speaking children scored significantly higher on lingual force and diadochokinetic rate measurements. These findings challenge the notion that lisping is purely ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1978
Protrusive Lingual Force and Lingual Diadochokinetic Rates: A Comparative Analysis between Normal and Lisping Speakers
 
Author Notes
  • At the time that this article was written, James P. Dworkin was affiliated with the Department of Speech Pathology-Audiology at State University College, Geneseo, New York. Since September 1, 1977, Dworkin holds a postdoctoral fellowship at the Department of Speech Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Requests for reprints may be sent to him there.
    At the time that this article was written, James P. Dworkin was affiliated with the Department of Speech Pathology-Audiology at State University College, Geneseo, New York. Since September 1, 1977, Dworkin holds a postdoctoral fellowship at the Department of Speech Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Requests for reprints may be sent to him there.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1978
Protrusive Lingual Force and Lingual Diadochokinetic Rates: A Comparative Analysis between Normal and Lisping Speakers
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1978, Vol. 9, 8-16. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0901.08
History: Received May 28, 1976 , Accepted June 9, 1977
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1978, Vol. 9, 8-16. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0901.08
History: Received May 28, 1976; Accepted June 9, 1977

This study examines protrusive lingual force and lingual diadochokinetic rates in normal and frontal-lisping speakers. Force measurements were obtained using an instrument designed for this investigation. Results revealed that normal-speaking children scored significantly higher on lingual force and diadochokinetic rate measurements. These findings challenge the notion that lisping is purely a functional articulatory disorder. Explanations for diagnosis and management are discussed.

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