The Experimental Use of Cross-Age Relationships in Public School Speech Remediation The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to investigate the effectiveness of older public school students with and without articulatory errors administering speech remediation to younger children with articulatory difficulty; and (2) to examine whether the older students could effect change in their own articulation by administering speech remediation. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1976
The Experimental Use of Cross-Age Relationships in Public School Speech Remediation
 
Author Notes
  • Michael Groher was affiliated with the University of Redlands at the time this study was performed. He is currently chief of speech pathology, American Lake Veterans Administration Hospital, Tacoma, Washington 98493. Requests for reprints may be sent to him there.
    Michael Groher was affiliated with the University of Redlands at the time this study was performed. He is currently chief of speech pathology, American Lake Veterans Administration Hospital, Tacoma, Washington 98493. Requests for reprints may be sent to him there.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1976
The Experimental Use of Cross-Age Relationships in Public School Speech Remediation
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1976, Vol. 7, 250-258. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0704.250
History: Received April 12, 1975 , Accepted December 21, 1975
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1976, Vol. 7, 250-258. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0704.250
History: Received April 12, 1975; Accepted December 21, 1975

The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to investigate the effectiveness of older public school students with and without articulatory errors administering speech remediation to younger children with articulatory difficulty; and (2) to examine whether the older students could effect change in their own articulation by administering speech remediation. The results suggest that those older students who evidenced articulatory errors and who were administering speech remediation could effect change in the younger students' articulatory patterns, while at the same time improving their own skills. The value of using older students as service providers in a public school setting is discussed.

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