Supervision: A Case Study Occasionally, it is the responsibility of a supervisor to help a staff speech clinician resolve professional and or personal problems that interfere with the delivery of quality services. To deal with this situation, the supervisor must be equipped with the techniques and procedures for effective organizational communication. This article presents ... Case Study
Case Study  |   October 01, 1977
Supervision: A Case Study
 
Author Notes
  • Roberta Chapey is an assistant professor at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn 11210. Requests for reprints may be directed to her there. Geraldine Chapey is the assistant director of the Bureau for Speech Improvement of the New York City Board of Education.
    Roberta Chapey is an assistant professor at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn 11210. Requests for reprints may be directed to her there. Geraldine Chapey is the assistant director of the Bureau for Speech Improvement of the New York City Board of Education.×
Article Information
Case Study
Case Study   |   October 01, 1977
Supervision: A Case Study
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1977, Vol. 8, 256-263. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0804.256
History: Received January 30, 1976 , Accepted June 7, 1977
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1977, Vol. 8, 256-263. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0804.256
History: Received January 30, 1976; Accepted June 7, 1977

Occasionally, it is the responsibility of a supervisor to help a staff speech clinician resolve professional and or personal problems that interfere with the delivery of quality services. To deal with this situation, the supervisor must be equipped with the techniques and procedures for effective organizational communication. This article presents a case study in which a speech clinician demonstrated irresponsibility in various job areas. The supervisor’s philosophy and the procedures used in managing these problems are presented. The behavioral changes suggest that the supervisor’s interventive procedures were clinically significant and warrant further investigation.

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