A Developmental Analysis of the Acquisition of Compound Words This study examines the acquisition of compound words in relation to receptive vocabulary and grade level. Ten students, matched according to age, sex, class level, and socioeconomic status, were selected from each grade from kindergarten through fourth for a total of 50 subjects. Subjects were administered the Peabody Picture Vocabulary ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1977
A Developmental Analysis of the Acquisition of Compound Words
 
Author Notes
  • Susan Silvestri is a speech-language pathologist at the Pequannock Township Public Schools, 59 Boulevard, Pequannock, New Jersey 07740. Requests for reprints may be directed to her there. Richard Silvestri is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at William Paterson College of New Jersey, Wayne.
    Susan Silvestri is a speech-language pathologist at the Pequannock Township Public Schools, 59 Boulevard, Pequannock, New Jersey 07740. Requests for reprints may be directed to her there. Richard Silvestri is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at William Paterson College of New Jersey, Wayne.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1977
A Developmental Analysis of the Acquisition of Compound Words
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1977, Vol. 8, 217-221. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0804.217
History: Received January 30, 1976 , Accepted November 12, 1976
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1977, Vol. 8, 217-221. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0804.217
History: Received January 30, 1976; Accepted November 12, 1976

This study examines the acquisition of compound words in relation to receptive vocabulary and grade level. Ten students, matched according to age, sex, class level, and socioeconomic status, were selected from each grade from kindergarten through fourth for a total of 50 subjects. Subjects were administered the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test and asked to define 10 compound words composed of two nouns, for example, blackboard and snowman. The subjects' definitions were then rated in ascending order from one to four according to their level of sophistication. The findings indicate that the acquisition of compound words proceeds from a unitary conception of the word to one based on an awareness and understanding of the meaning of its components as well as their intended meaning in the composite form.

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