Trainable Children Can Learn Adjectives, Polars, and Prepositions! Twelve trainable mentally retarded children were given six weeks of instruction in the use of adjectives, polars, and locative prepositions. Specially prepared Language Master cards constituted the program. Posttests indicated that children in the older chronological age group earned significantly higher scores than those in the younger group. Children in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1977
Trainable Children Can Learn Adjectives, Polars, and Prepositions!
 
Author Notes
  • Marlys Mitchell is an associate professor in occupational therapy at the School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. Requests for reprints may be addressed to her there. Carolyn Evans is a graduate student in special education, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. John Bernard is a research assistant, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
    Marlys Mitchell is an associate professor in occupational therapy at the School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. Requests for reprints may be addressed to her there. Carolyn Evans is a graduate student in special education, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. John Bernard is a research assistant, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1977
Trainable Children Can Learn Adjectives, Polars, and Prepositions!
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1977, Vol. 8, 181-187. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0803.181
History: Received December 1, 1975 , Accepted September 13, 1976
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1977, Vol. 8, 181-187. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0803.181
History: Received December 1, 1975; Accepted September 13, 1976

Twelve trainable mentally retarded children were given six weeks of instruction in the use of adjectives, polars, and locative prepositions. Specially prepared Language Master cards constituted the program. Posttests indicated that children in the older chronological age group earned significantly higher scores than those in the younger group. Children in the younger group made significant increases in scores, particularly in learning prepositions. A multisensory approach and active involvement in learning appeared to be major factors in achievement gains.

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