A Five-Year Longitudinal Study of Development of Articulation Proficiency in Elementary School Children This paper reports the results of a five-year longitudinal study of the spontaneous development of articulation proficiency in 60 elementary school children. The subjects received no remediation in speech other than that which occurred in connection with regular classroom instruction. Articulation was tested at the beginning of each school year ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1977
A Five-Year Longitudinal Study of Development of Articulation Proficiency in Elementary School Children
 
Author Notes
  • Ralph C. Bralley and Ralph J. Stoudt, Jr., are both associate professors of speech pathology and audiology at the University of Virginia. Requests for reprints may be directed to Ralph C. Bralley, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 109 Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903.
    Ralph C. Bralley and Ralph J. Stoudt, Jr., are both associate professors of speech pathology and audiology at the University of Virginia. Requests for reprints may be directed to Ralph C. Bralley, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 109 Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1977
A Five-Year Longitudinal Study of Development of Articulation Proficiency in Elementary School Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1977, Vol. 8, 176-180. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0803.176
History: Received December 16, 1975 , Accepted September 13, 1976
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1977, Vol. 8, 176-180. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0803.176
History: Received December 16, 1975; Accepted September 13, 1976

This paper reports the results of a five-year longitudinal study of the spontaneous development of articulation proficiency in 60 elementary school children. The subjects received no remediation in speech other than that which occurred in connection with regular classroom instruction. Articulation was tested at the beginning of each school year in Grades 1 through 5. The results indicate that 47 children developed adequate articulation during the five years. Clinical implications and the need for further research in the development of predictive tests of articulation are discussed.

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