Signed English: A Language Teaching Technique with Totally Nonverbal, Severely Mentally Retarded Adolescents A language teaching technique utilizing Signed English with four totally nonverbal, severely mentally retarded adolescents is described. The subjects' progress is reported and a supplementary parent program is described. Results of this technique were threefold: (1) the subjects developed 200-word signed vocabularies in a 10-month period and were using the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1977
Signed English: A Language Teaching Technique with Totally Nonverbal, Severely Mentally Retarded Adolescents
 
Author Notes
  • Sue Ellen Linville was a staff speech-language pathologist in the Children and Youth Project of the Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston 77550. At the time this program was developed and implemented the author was employed in the Galveston Independent School District.
    Sue Ellen Linville was a staff speech-language pathologist in the Children and Youth Project of the Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston 77550. At the time this program was developed and implemented the author was employed in the Galveston Independent School District.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1977
Signed English: A Language Teaching Technique with Totally Nonverbal, Severely Mentally Retarded Adolescents
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1977, Vol. 8, 170-175. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0803.170
History: Received January 13, 1976 , Accepted October 18, 1976
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1977, Vol. 8, 170-175. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0803.170
History: Received January 13, 1976; Accepted October 18, 1976

A language teaching technique utilizing Signed English with four totally nonverbal, severely mentally retarded adolescents is described. The subjects' progress is reported and a supplementary parent program is described. Results of this technique were threefold: (1) the subjects developed 200-word signed vocabularies in a 10-month period and were using the vocabulary spontaneously as well as generating original sentences, (2) increases in auditory comprehension of single words and simple commands were demonstrated, and (3) stimulation of oral production as a result of this technique was realized in two of the four subjects.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access