Responses of Black and White Children to the Grammatic Closure Subtest of the ITPA Seventy normal black and white elementary school children (K through 6) were administered the Grammatic Closure Subtest of the ITPA (Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities). Responses suggest three stages in normal children’s development of irregular inflectional morphemes: (1) lack of inflection of base forms (big for bigger), (2) overgeneralization of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1977
Responses of Black and White Children to the Grammatic Closure Subtest of the ITPA
 
Author Notes
  • Judith Duchan and R. David Baskervill are assistant professors in the Communication Disorders Department, State University College at Buffalo, 1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, New York 14222. Requests for reprints may be directed there to Judith Dunchan.
    Judith Duchan and R. David Baskervill are assistant professors in the Communication Disorders Department, State University College at Buffalo, 1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, New York 14222. Requests for reprints may be directed there to Judith Dunchan.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1977
Responses of Black and White Children to the Grammatic Closure Subtest of the ITPA
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1977, Vol. 8, 126-132. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0802.126
History: Received December 10, 1975 , Accepted July 19, 1976
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1977, Vol. 8, 126-132. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0802.126
History: Received December 10, 1975; Accepted July 19, 1976

Seventy normal black and white elementary school children (K through 6) were administered the Grammatic Closure Subtest of the ITPA (Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities). Responses suggest three stages in normal children’s development of irregular inflectional morphemes: (1) lack of inflection of base forms (big for bigger), (2) overgeneralization of regular forms to irregular forms (foots for feet), and (3) correct formation of irregular morphemes. Black and white children responded differently to nine of the 27 items analyzed. Some of these differences can be explained by dialectal differences between the groups, indicating that the test is biased in favor of Standard English speakers. Error analysis suggests that language training programs should be geared to teaching irregular inflectional morphemes rather than teaching other linguistic elements such as prepositions or compound sentences.

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