Teachers' Predictions of the Social Position and Speaking Competence of Stuttering Students Teachers' predictions of their students' judgments of the social position and speaking competence of stuttering boys in their classes were compared with the judgments made by the children. Teachers' predictions did not differ significantly from the children’s actual judgments, regardless of the grade level (third or sixth) or stuttering severity ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1975
Teachers' Predictions of the Social Position and Speaking Competence of Stuttering Students
 
Author Notes
  • C. Lee Woods conducted this research as a research associate while at the University of Iowa. He is currently director, Stuttering Treatment Programme, Division of Communication Disorders, University of New South Wales Teaching Hospitals, Little Bay, N.S.W. 2036, Australia.
    C. Lee Woods conducted this research as a research associate while at the University of Iowa. He is currently director, Stuttering Treatment Programme, Division of Communication Disorders, University of New South Wales Teaching Hospitals, Little Bay, N.S.W. 2036, Australia.×
Article Information
Research Article
Research Article   |   October 01, 1975
Teachers' Predictions of the Social Position and Speaking Competence of Stuttering Students
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1975, Vol. 6, 177-182. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0604.177
History: Received August 30, 1974 , Accepted January 11, 1975
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1975, Vol. 6, 177-182. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0604.177
History: Received August 30, 1974; Accepted January 11, 1975

Teachers' predictions of their students' judgments of the social position and speaking competence of stuttering boys in their classes were compared with the judgments made by the children. Teachers' predictions did not differ significantly from the children’s actual judgments, regardless of the grade level (third or sixth) or stuttering severity (mild or moderate and severe) of the stuttering boys. Reasons for unfavorable judgments by the children were usually similar to those mentioned by the teachers in their predictions. Several implications of these results for school personnel are discussed.

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