Some Implications of Listening Level for Speech Reception by Sensorineural Hearing-Impaired Children The benefits of amplification for sensorineural hearing-impaired persons listening at low levels were investigated. Eleven college students were tested, and the results suggest that the level above threshold at which a person listens to speech may ultimately influence the benefits obtained from amplification. The data indicate the possibility of an ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1975
Some Implications of Listening Level for Speech Reception by Sensorineural Hearing-Impaired Children
 
Author Notes
  • Roy Gengel, formerly an associate professor of Auditory Research at Gallaudet College, Washington, D.C., is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts. Requests for reprints may be directed to him at the Sensory Communication Laboratory, Gallaudet College, Washington, D.C., 20002. Kathleen Foust is currently at the Audiology and Speech Clinic, Crippled Children’s Services, D.C. General Hospital, Washington, D.C.
    Roy Gengel, formerly an associate professor of Auditory Research at Gallaudet College, Washington, D.C., is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts. Requests for reprints may be directed to him at the Sensory Communication Laboratory, Gallaudet College, Washington, D.C., 20002. Kathleen Foust is currently at the Audiology and Speech Clinic, Crippled Children’s Services, D.C. General Hospital, Washington, D.C.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1975
Some Implications of Listening Level for Speech Reception by Sensorineural Hearing-Impaired Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1975, Vol. 6, 14-20. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0601.14
History: Received March 6, 1974 , Accepted April 17, 1974
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1975, Vol. 6, 14-20. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0601.14
History: Received March 6, 1974; Accepted April 17, 1974

The benefits of amplification for sensorineural hearing-impaired persons listening at low levels were investigated. Eleven college students were tested, and the results suggest that the level above threshold at which a person listens to speech may ultimately influence the benefits obtained from amplification. The data indicate the possibility of an additional limitation to the potential for auditory speech communication when these persons cannot listen comfortably at levels above threshold of 20 to 30 dB or more.

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