An Introduction to the Historical Development of Black English: Some Implications for American Education Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1972
An Introduction to the Historical Development of Black English: Some Implications for American Education
 
Author Notes
  • Orlando L. Taylor

    author’s note:Since the time this paper was originally prepared several new developments have occurred in the historical study of Black English. Some arguments give more detailed support for a link between African and Afro-American speech (for example, Dillard, 1972). Others negate such a link (for example, Williamson, 1972). I am preparing an updated treatise on the implications of these new data.

  • Orlando Taylor is a sociolinguist and director of the Institute of Urban Language Research of the Department of Communication Sciences at Federal City College. Requests for reprints may be addressed to him at Institute of Urban Language Research, Federal City College, 724 9th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001.
    Orlando Taylor is a sociolinguist and director of the Institute of Urban Language Research of the Department of Communication Sciences at Federal City College. Requests for reprints may be addressed to him at Institute of Urban Language Research, Federal City College, 724 9th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1972
An Introduction to the Historical Development of Black English: Some Implications for American Education
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1972, Vol. 3, 5-15. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0304.05
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1972, Vol. 3, 5-15. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.0304.05
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