Improving Clinical Services: Be Aware of Fuzzy Connections Between Principles and Strategies PurposeThis article is a response to Alan Kamhi's treatise on improving clinical practices for children with language and learning disorders by focusing on what is known about learning (see Kamhi, 2014, article in this issue).MethodDescriptive methods are used to discuss general learning principles and the fact that they do not ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   April 2014
Improving Clinical Services: Be Aware of Fuzzy Connections Between Principles and Strategies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandra Laing Gillam
    Utah State University, Logan
  • Ronald B. Gillam
    Utah State University, Logan
  • Disclosures: There are two disclosures. First, the two authors of this article developed a program on the basis of their research and funding from the Institute for Educational Sciences (see Gillam, Gillam, & Laing, 2012). Second, the Test of Narrative Language was developed by Ronald B. Gillam (second author).
    Disclosures: There are two disclosures. First, the two authors of this article developed a program on the basis of their research and funding from the Institute for Educational Sciences (see Gillam, Gillam, & Laing, 2012). Second, the Test of Narrative Language was developed by Ronald B. Gillam (second author).×
  • Correspondence to Sandra Laing Gillam: sandi.gillam@usu.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: LaVae Hoffman
    Associate Editor: LaVae Hoffman×
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum   |   April 2014
Improving Clinical Services: Be Aware of Fuzzy Connections Between Principles and Strategies
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2014, Vol. 45, 137-144. doi:10.1044/2014_LSHSS-14-0024
History: Received February 28, 2014 , Revised March 7, 2014 , Accepted March 19, 2014
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2014, Vol. 45, 137-144. doi:10.1044/2014_LSHSS-14-0024
History: Received February 28, 2014; Revised March 7, 2014; Accepted March 19, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3
Acknowledgments
Some of the work reported in this article was supported by Institute for Educational Sciences Grant R324A100063, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant U01 DC04560-02, and the Lillywhite Endowment at Utah State University. We thank Daphne Hartzheim, Megan Boyle, and Vicki Simonsmeier for their thoughtful input on an earlier version of this article.

PurposeThis article is a response to Alan Kamhi's treatise on improving clinical practices for children with language and learning disorders by focusing on what is known about learning (see Kamhi, 2014, article in this issue).

MethodDescriptive methods are used to discuss general learning principles and the fact that they do not always translate readily into effective language intervention practices. The authors give examples of 2 instances in which popular intervention strategies should have worked but did not. The authors also summarize what they learned about their own approach to contextualized language intervention for teaching priority goals related to narration and the Common Core State Standards (CCSS; National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, & Council of Chief State School Officers, 2010).

ConclusionEven theoretically sound, well-intentioned, and carefully implemented interventions can result in equivocal outcomes. When they do, careful attention to the evidence and willingness to rethink strategy often serves to right the course.

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